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Archive for September, 2009

Environment
Major South Pacific Quake Spawns Tsunami

By LiveScience Staff

posted: 29 September 2009 03:20 pm ET
Updated 6:01 p.m. ET:

Editor’s Note: The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center cancelled all warnings and watches associated with this event. The article below remains as last updated prior to the cancellations.

A major earthquake struck in the Somoa Islands region of the South Pacific Ocean. The preliminary magnitude was 7.9, according to the USGS, which later upgraded the temblor to 8.0.

A tsunami warning was issued for New Zealand and nearby islands but it’s not yet clear if any real danger exists.

AP reports that a tsunami rolled 100 yards inland at Pago Pago in American Samoa, but few details were provided. Reuters reports there are deaths, citing a U.S. National Park Service official. Various wave heights are being reported, from 5 feet to 20 feet high.

Even major earthquakes under the sea do not always generate significant tsunamis. It depends on whether and how much the floor of the sea shifts. A tsunami can be created when a significant thrust on the seafloor acts like a giant paddle.

No tsunami is expected along the California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, and Alaska coasts, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said initially. The center did, however, release a map showing how long it would take for any possible tsunami from this quake to reach various shorelines in the Pacific basin. A tsunami watch — not a warning — is now in effect for Hawaii. Tsunamis can take hours to cross the open ocean.

This quake was centered 1,670 miles (2685 km) from Auckland, New Zealand and just 125 miles from one of the Samoan islands. It originated 21.7 miles (35 km) beneach the seafloor. It struck at about 1:48 p.m. ET.

On the open ocean, a tsunami is barely noticeable. A wave that might be just inches high can soar to building-tall proportions as it meets a rising seafloor near the coast.

Earthquakes and Tsunamis: How They Work
Video – Recreating an Ancient Tsunami
West Coast Tsunami Risk Higher Than Thought

Source: http://www.livescience.com/environment/090929-somoa-earthquake-tsunami.html

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Earthquakes and Tsunamis: How They Work

Andrea Thompson
Senior Writer
LiveScience.com andrea Thompson
senior Writer
livescience.com
Tue Sep 29, 4:32 pm ET

Earthquakes and tsunamis, such as the powerful quake that occurred today in the South Pacific and wave it generated, can often go hand-in-hand.

 

Tsunamis, which can travel over the ocean surface from many hundreds of miles, can be generated when chunks of the planet’s crust separate under the seafloor, causing an earthquake. Today’s temblor was put at magnitude 8.0 by the U.S. Geological Survey. The potential height of the tsunami is not yet known.

 

Here’s what happens: One slab of lifting crust essentially rapidly acts as a giant paddle, transferring its energy to the water.

 

Tsunamis can also be caused by volcanic eruptions, underwater detonations and even landslides.

 

Exactly what caused today’s tsunami is not yet clear. And officials have been scrambling to issue watches and warnings and estimate what might occur.

 

The resulting waves are hard to predict for several reasons. Nobody knows how a quake has affected the seafloor until hours, days or even months after the event. And a tsunami is almost imperceptible on the open ocean, rising to full ferocity only as it nears the shore.

 

While more tsunami-sensing buoys cover the ocean than before the devastating 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, these waves can still be missed.

 

Not all seafloor earthquakes will generate a tsunami – if the friction between the crustal plates occurs very deep below the ocean floor or move in a way that causes a minimal paddle effect, a tsunami isn’t as likely to form.

 

The 2004 quake just off the coast of Sumatra, Indonesia, was colossal, eventually put at magnitude 9.3. But an 8.7-magnitude earthquake in 2005 that originated at the same location, while large enough to generate a devastating tsunami, scientists say, did not do so. The exact reasons remain mysterious.

 

The 2004 tsunami, and those spurred by the 9.2-magnitude Great Alaska Earthquake in 1964, were examples of teletsunamis, which can cross entire oceans.

 

Several devastating tsunamis have occurred throughout recorded history, including one that leveled Lisbon, Portugal in 1755 and one generated by the explosion of Krakatoa in Indonesia that drowned an estimated 36,000 people.

 

Except for the largest tsunamis, such as the 2004 Indian Ocean event, most tsunamis do not result in giant breaking waves; instead they come in much like very strong and fast-moving tides, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. As a tsunami nears the shoreline, the rising seafloor forces a wave that might have been just inches tall into a monster that can be several feet high.

 

The Pacific Ocean basin is particularly prone to tsunamis; a study earlier this year found that the tsunami risk to the west coast of the United States was higher than previously thought.

LiveScience.com chronicles the daily advances and innovations made in science and technology. We take on the misconceptions that often pop up around scientific discoveries and deliver short, provocative explanations with a certain wit and style. Check out our science videos, Trivia & Quizzes and Top 10s. Join our community to debate hot-button issues like stem cells, climate change and evolution. You can also sign up for free newsletters, register for RSS feeds and get cool gadgets at the LiveScience Store. Earthquakes and tsunamis, such as the powerful quake that occurred today in the South Pacific and wave it generated, can often go hand-in-hand.

 

Tsunamis, which can travel over the ocean surface from many hundreds of miles, can be generated when chunks of the planet’s crust separate under the seafloor, causing an earthquake. Today’s temblor was put at magnitude 8.0 by the U.S. Geological Survey. The potential height of the tsunami is not yet known.

 

Here’s what happens: One slab of lifting crust essentially rapidly acts as a giant paddle, transferring its energy to the water.

 

Tsunamis can also be caused by volcanic eruptions, underwater detonations and even landslides.

 

Exactly what caused today’s tsunami is not yet clear. And officials have been scrambling to issue watches and warnings and estimate what might occur.

 

The resulting waves are hard to predict for several reasons. Nobody knows how a quake has affected the seafloor until hours, days or even months after the event. And a tsunami is almost imperceptible on the open ocean, rising to full ferocity only as it nears the shore.

 

While more tsunami-sensing buoys cover the ocean than before the devastating 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, these waves can still be missed.

 

Not all seafloor earthquakes will generate a tsunami – if the friction between the crustal plates occurs very deep below the ocean floor or move in a way that causes a minimal paddle effect, a tsunami isn’t as likely to form.

 

The 2004 quake just off the coast of Sumatra, Indonesia, was colossal, eventually put at magnitude 9.3. But an 8.7-magnitude earthquake in 2005 that originated at the same location, while large enough to generate a devastating tsunami, scientists say, did not do so. The exact reasons remain mysterious.

 

The 2004 tsunami, and those spurred by the 9.2-magnitude Great Alaska Earthquake in 1964, were examples of teletsunamis, which can cross entire oceans.

 

Several devastating tsunamis have occurred throughout recorded history, including one that leveled Lisbon, Portugal in 1755 and one generated by the explosion of Krakatoa in Indonesia that drowned an estimated 36,000 people.

 

Except for the largest tsunamis, such as the 2004 Indian Ocean event, most tsunamis do not result in giant breaking waves; instead they come in much like very strong and fast-moving tides, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. As a tsunami nears the shoreline, the rising seafloor forces a wave that might have been just inches tall into a monster that can be several feet high.

 

The Pacific Ocean basin is particularly prone to tsunamis; a study earlier this year found that the tsunami risk to the west coast of the United States was higher than previously thought.

LiveScience.com chronicles the daily advances and innovations made in science and technology. We take on the misconceptions that often pop up around scientific discoveries and deliver short, provocative explanations with a certain wit and style. Check out our science videos, Trivia & Quizzes and Top 10s. Join our community to debate hot-button issues like stem cells, climate change and evolution. You can also sign up for free newsletters, register for RSS feeds and get cool gadgets at the LiveScience Store.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/earthquakesandtsunamishowtheywork

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Biarkan Ikan Purba Itu Berbiak di Perairan Sulawesi Utara

 

Kamis, 24 September 2009 | 08:27 WIB

MANADO, KOMPAS.com — Perairan Sulawesi Utara (Sulut) layak dijadikan konservasi ikan purba Coelacanth, sejalan dengan cukup seringnya ikan jenis itu ditemukan di wilayah tersebut.
     
“Beberapa tahun terakhir di perairan Sulut ditemukan ikan purba Coelacanth, makanya perlu diberi perhatian serius sehingga ikan tersebut tidak punah,” kata Heard Runtuwene, peneliti dari Fakultas Perikanan dan Kelautan Universitas Sam Ratulangi, Manado, Kamis (24/9).
     
Coelacanth adalah ikan yang berasal dari sebuah cabang evolusi tertua yang masih hidup dari ikan berahang. Sebelumnya, ikan tersebut sempat diperkirakan sudah punah sejak akhir masa Cretaceous 65 juta tahun lalu, sampai sebuah spesimen kemudian ditemukan di Timur Afrika Selatan, di perairan Sungai Chalumna tahun 1938.
     
Di Indonesia, khususnya di sekitar perairan Manado dan Minahasa Utara, spesies ini oleh masyarakat lokal dinamai ikan raja laut. Coelacanth terdiri atas sekitar 120 spesies yang diketahui berdasarkan penemuan fosil.
     
Setelah penemuan pada tahun 2007 lalu oleh nelayan di Manado, pada 2009 kembali ditemukan di perairan Minahasa Utara melalui survei yang dilakukan Fakultas Ilmu Perikanan dan Kelautan Unsrat, LIPI, dan Fukushima Aquarime.
     
“Ditemukannya ikan purba di perairan Sulut menandakan wilayah kita masih diselimuti beragam ikan unik dan purba,” katanya.
     
Temuan di perairan Minahasa Utara pada 16 September 2009 itu berawal dari tersangkutnya ikan purba itu pada jaring seorang nelayan di Pulau Talise. Ikan yang terjaring saat itu memiliki panjang tubuh 114,5 sentimeter, dengan berat 27 kg.
    
Usulan perairan Sulut layak dijadikan daerah konservasi mendapat dukungan resmi dari DPRD Sulut, dengan meminta pemerintah daerah dapat memberikan perhatian serius. “Perairan Sulut menggambarkan penuh dengan kekayaan sumber daya hayati serta menyimpan sejarah penting bagi dunia kelautan,” kata Benny Rhamdani, anggota DPRD Sulut.

Sumber: http://regional.kompas.com/read/xml/2009/09/24/08270268/Biarkan.Ikan.Purba.itu.Berbiak.di.Perairan.Sulawesi.Utara

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Selamat merayakan Iedul Fithri 1430 H yang bertepatan dengan 20 September 2009 M

Toqobballahu minna waminkum. Mohon maaf zahir dan bathin

Semoga Allah swt menerima amal ibdah kita dan semoga kita kembali fithri. Amiin

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Rawa Singkil: Mutiara di Ekosistem Leuser

Rawa Singkil-Mutiara di Ekosistem Leuser

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Buah hati ke-3

Alhamdulillah, atas karunia Allah swt, telah lahir anak kami ke-3, laki-laki dengan berat 3,1 kg, panjang 50 cm di RSU Sundari, Kampung Lalang, Medan pada pagi Rabu 9 Sept 2009M bertepatan dengan 19 Ramadhan 1430H pukul 9.53 wib (menurut waktu di HP saya) atau 9.55 wib (menurut waktu tenaga medis yang menangani persalinan). Alhamdulillah persalinan lancar, normal, serta bunda dan anak sehat wal afiat.
Kehadiran sang bayi laki-laki setelah 2 saudara perempuannya, yakni
1. Syamilah Mustaqimah Onrizal (lahir di Medan, 9 Januari 2000M/2 Syawal 1420H; hampir 10 tahun) dan
2. Najwa Syifa Habibillah Onrizal (lahir di Bogor, 13 Juli 2004; 5 tahun 2 bulan).
 
Semoga kehadiran sang buah hati ketiga kami di bulan suci Ramadhan penuh berkahi ini menambah ketaatan dan kesyukuran kami kepada Allah swt.
 
Mohon doa para orang tua, guru, abang/kakak dan saudara kami, semoga sang anak menjadi menjadi anak sholeh, qurrota a’yun lil mutaqina imama serta pembela agama, nusa dan bangsa. Amiin.
Terima kasih atas doa dan dukungan serta bimbingan kepada kami.
Wassalamualaikum wr wb
 
Kami yang berbahagia:
Onrizal (Ayah)
Sri Lestari (Bunda)
Syamilah (Kakak ke-1)
Syifa (Kakak ke-2)
Datuk/nenek (Sungai Dareh-Sumbar)
Mbah Kakung/Mbah Putri (Sragen, Jawa Tengah)
Serta keluarga besar

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Pada 4-6 Nov 2009 akan diadakan Seminar Internasional di Bogor tentang RESEARCH ON PLANTATION FOREST MANAGEMENT: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES. Berikut informasi lengkapnya.

RESEARCH ON PLANTATION FOREST MANAGEMENT:

CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES”

Centre for Plantation Forest Research and Development, Forestry Research and Development Agency, Ministry of Forestry, Republic of Indonesia , will organize International Seminar with main topic : “Research on Plantation Forest Management : Challenges and Opportunities”  in Bogor – Indonesia , 5 – 6 November 2009. The objectives of the seminar are mainly to learn state of the art of R & D on plantation forest management in all parts of the world, share knowledge and experiences in R & D in relevant fields, discuss challenges and opportunities for R & D in supporting the world plantation forest development.

The seminar will cover following sub-themes :

a.   Plantation Forest Management:

  • Slow growing: Teak, Mahagony, Pinus merkusii
  • Fast growing : A. mangium, Eucalyptus spp
  • Mixed plantation forest : A combination of fast and slow growing species
  • Community forest

b.  Plantation Forest Industries:

  • Wood based industry
  • Non-Wood Forest Product Industry

c.   Environment Management of Plantation Forest

  • Carbon
  • Water
  • Ecotourism
  • Biodiversity

Please see the attachment for detail information regarding the seminar & get the Registration Form.

Attachment Size
Call_4_Paper.pdf 85.74 KB
Registration_Form_CPF_09.doc 39 KB

Source: http://www.dephut.go.id/index.php?q=en/node/5569

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